R. D. Lawrence (1921-2003)

Ronald Douglas Lawrence (1921-2003) lived in many places and tried many things. Among his accomplishments he and his second wife, Joan, maintained a wilderness property, “The Place”, near Uphill (page 219, The Place in the Forest) in Kawartha Lakes (then Victoria County) where Lawrence studied the local wolf pack. He wrote about it in The Place in the Forest. Then they bought a 350-acre farm of mostly wilderness, “North Star Farm,” where they cared for orphaned and abandoned animals. He chronicled the humorous account of this time in the book, The Zoo That Never Was. Lawrence sold the property after Joan’s death.

Lawrence was a Canadian naturalist and wildlife author of over 30 books.

Born on a ship off the coast of Spain, Lawrence was raised in Spain and at age 14 lied about his age so he could fight in the Spanish Civil War. He served for two years until he found himself outnumbered in the Pyrenees and fled to France. He made his way back home just in time for the arrival of WWII. He enlisted with the British and went to war again. He participated in D-Day at Normandy where he was seriously injured.

After the war, Lawrence he enrolled at Cambridge University where he studied biology for three years but did not complete his degree. He returned to Spain where he worked as a journalist and novelist.

He moved to Canada in 1954 and became a reporter for the Toronto Star. He also worked for the Winnipeg Press and Toronto Telegram. Among his reporting duties, he went to Africa as a foreign correspondent.

Lawrence and his third wife bought property in Haliburton. Lawrence helped establish the Haliburton Forest Wolf Centre.

He died in Haliburton in 2003.

Books set in Kawartha Lakes:

The Place in the Forest (1967)

The Zoo That Never Was (1981)

Books:

Wildlife in Canada (1966)

The Place in the Forest (1967)

Where the Water Lilies Grow (1968)

The Poison Makers (1969)

Cry Wild (1970)

Maple Syrup (1971)

Wildlife in North America: Mammals (1974)

Wildlife in North America: Birds (1974)

Paddy (1977)

Discover Ste. Marie (1978)

The North Runner (1979)

Secret Go the Wolves (1980)

The Study of Life: A Naturalist’s View (1980)

The Zoo That Never Was (1981)

Voyage of the Stella (1982)

The Ghost Walker (1983)

Canada’s National Parks (1983)

The Shark (1985)

In Praise of Wolves (1986)

Trans-Canada Country, 1986

The Natural History of Canada (1988)

For the Love of Mike (Pour L’Amour de Mike) (1989)

Wolves (1990)

The White Puma (1990)

Trail of the Wolf (1993)

The Green Trees Beyond (1994) – memoir

A Shriek in the Forest Night (1996)

Owls, the Silent Fliers (1997)

Hardy, William George (1895-1979)

W. G. Hardy was a writer, professor and hockey administrator. Born and raised on a farm called “The Elms” near Lindsay, Ontario, to parents George and Annie, Hardy was one of seven children. His sister, Winnifred Hardy, served as a nursing sister for WWI. Official records put his place of birth as Peniel, Ontario, but all that remains of the community once located at the intersection of Peniel Road and Kawartha Lakes County Road 46 is a church.

South of this intersection, Hardy attended school where he used to daydream while completing school by age 10. “They let me go at my own pace.” He was writing epic poetry by age 12. For the next few years, he worked the farm and taught himself Greek. He already knew Latin.

Hardy attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto, first attempting a mathematics degree, but then switching to the Classics so he could obtain a scholarship. He paid for his degree in scholarships, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in 1917.

While at university, Hardy served the Canadian Officers’ Training Corps. In April 1917, Hardy tried to enlist for WWI, signing up for the 109th Battalion in Lindsay, but was rejected for medical reasons. He returned to serve the University of Toronto’s Officers Company, but was discharged due to his heart condition. He never saw active service.

While working towards his Masters in Arts at the University of Toronto, Hardy married Llewella May Sonley and managed a publication called The Rebel.

After obtaining his Masters in 1920, Hardy took a position as a lecturer at the University of Alberta, and by 1922 he earned a Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Chicago and a professorship at the University of Alberta. From 1938 to 1964, Hardy served at head of the Department of Classics. He gave talks about the Classics on CBC Radio. In 1979, the CBC published unedited transcripts of this radio programs in the book, CBC television programs on W.G. Hardy and Hazel McCuaig (1979.) Additionally, Hardy criticized fascism and the modern education system. His articles about the Alberta education system were collected and published in the booklet, Education in Alberta (1954.)

After relocating to Alberta, Hardy began coaching the Alberta Golden Bears hockey team. He served as president of the Alberta Amateur Hockey Association and was appointed to the Alberta branch of the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada. Hardy put forth a motion to have the 1936 Summer Olympics taken away from Berlin due to Germany banning Jewish athletes. Hockey in Western Canada flourished with Hardy’s involvement, but was not without problems:

Hardy publicized the CAHA ambitions and published the article “Should We Revise Our Amateur Laws?” in Maclean’s on November 1, 1936. He argued for updating the definition of amateur, when it was commonly accepted to bend the rules in hockey. He felt that the AAU of C was hypocritical for classifying cricket, soccer, and tennis as pastime sports where athletes may compete with or against professionals and still be called amateurs. He sought for these inconsistencies with respect to professionals and amateurs should be “ironed out and a common-sense view be taken of the situation”. He further stated that the old definition of amateur came “from the days when only gentlemen with independent means were supposed to engage in sport”; and that in the era of the Great Depression, it was justified that a hockey player be allowed legitimate employment in sport and be compensated for work lost while away at playoffs or representing his country at international events.[39]

The amateur issue achieved significant press coverage by November 1936. Canadian journalist Scott Young wrote that public perception was against the AAU of C definition, and that Canadians were in favour of amateurs being compensated for travel, which was perceived as a reason for Canada not winning the gold medal in ice hockey at the 1936 Winter Olympics.[42] 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._G._Hardy

(Scott Young was also a writer in Kawartha Lakes.)

Hardy’s legacy in hockey lives on in the Dr. W. G. Hardy Trophy established 1951 and the Hardy Cup established in 1968.

While it may seem strange for a scholar of the Classics to be so involved in ice hockey and writing novels, Hardy didn’t think so. “That was the Greek way of doing things. I didn’t want to become a straight academic. I was too interested in people.”

Hardy wrote his first novel, A Son of Eli, during a two-week period in 1929 when his wife was away from home. McLean’s published the book as a serial. Hardy said, “I write very fast. I never pretended to be a genius, but I have a talent for writing. I know my stuff.” Hardy went on to publish a dozen more books, some fiction and others non-fiction, countless short stories, as well as curate two anthologies.

Hardy was president of the Alberta branch of the Canadian Authors Association in 1972 and president of the national organization at least three times. He gave workshops and was a judge for writing contests, including the 1963 contest for new lyrics for the Maple Leaf Forever.

Hardy said his writing was a hobby, but that writing was hard work. He believed, “Some write for money, some for fame and recognition and some because they have a passion to express themselves. Amateur writers need the passion most.” He did not think writers should be too ‘arty.’ He believed in writing to market while also finding a compromise between what writers want to write and what the public wants to read. “After all,” he said, “the function of words is to put across ideas— and so why not market them’.”

“I believe that everyone has a novel inside them, formed through their own experiences and observations,” Dr. Hardy said tliis was his third reason for believing writers in Alberta could produce novels.

Dr. Hardy, who was president of the 1972 convention of the Canadian Authors Association, said he believes there are many advantages to writing a novel rather than a short story.

He said novels can use more characters, more places and a less – rigid structure, than short stories. Dr. Hardy said “besides these points, writing a novel is more fun.”

How do people go about starting to write a novel? Dr. Hardy said a good way for most to begin is to base the novel on n topic with which they are familiar.

He said to begin any of the three main types of novels — historical, contemporary life, novelists should follow a few basic steps.

To start with they should analyze what special knowledge they have going for them which could be helpful as background for their writing. Then books should be read to see how’ other authors have handled that type of novel.

The next basic step is for the writer to decide if he wants to write in the first or third person. Dr. Hardy said he prefers first person because by use of first person many points of view and many different characters can be presented.

The other suggestions Dr. Hardy gave were to draw up a resume — to help decide what the novel will say; to choose characters carefully and to decide on an approach — realistic or romantic.

He said one of the last things a writer does before actually writing the novel is a story line. By use cf the story line the information that doesn’t fit the general theme is discarded.

Dr. Hardy said when the novelist has had a book published he has completed “an achievement equivalent to any in the world.”

https://newspaperarchive.com/sports-clipping-oct-02-1972-1461043/

Books:

A Son of Eli (1929)

Father Abraham (1935)

Turn Back the River (1938)

All the Trumpets Sounded (1942)

The Unfulfilled (1952)

The City of Libertines (1957)

From Sea Unto Sea: Canada — 1850 to 1910 (1959)

The Greek and Roman World (1962)

Our Heritage from the Past (1964)

Journey into the past (1965)

Origins and Ordeals of the Western World: Lessons from Our Heritage in History (1968)

The Scarlet Mantel (1978)

The Bloodied Toga (1979, posthumous)

Anthologies:

Alberta Golden Jubilee Anthology (1955)

Alberta: A Natural History (1967)

Ghadery, Hollay

Hollay Ghadery is a multi-genre writer living in rural Ontario on Anishinaabe land. She has her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph. Her acclaimed memoir on mixed-race identity and mental illness, Fuse, was released by Guernica Editions’ MiroLand imprint in Spring 2021. Her personal essays have also appeared on Today’s Parents and CBC Parents. You can find her on Instagram @hollayghadery and Twitter @Hollay2.

Author of:

Fuse

Doble, Mark

Mark Doble has a Bachelor of Music from McMaster University. He has written for fan magazines, websites and blogs about Canadian music. “Domenic Troiano – His Life and Music” is his first book.

Book:

“Domenic Troiano – His Life and Music”

https://www.thestar.com/local-kawartha-lakes/entertainment/books/2021/10/16/lindsay-author-s-debut-book-celebrates-canadian-guitar-legend.html

Hill, Lorne

 Lorne Hill has lived in Kawartha for 20 years, having summered here since 1958. He’s written 6 books; dozens of academic articles and reports to municipalities; won two small prizes at the Stephen Leacock festival for amateurs and is a member of the Lindsay Writers Group.

Background:

University of Toronto, History, Emeritus 
Professor and Chair of History Department at University of Toronto’s Faculty of Education; Department Head, Clarkson Secondary School, Clarkson Ontario; Assistant Head, Monarch Park Secondary School, Toronto Ontario; Educational Reviewer for the Books In Canada magazine; Director, Orillia NDP; Vice-president of Kawartha City Library Board; President, Lake Dalrymple Association for Environmental Protection; President, Lake Dalrymple Ratepayers Association; Patron, American School for Classical Studies; Member, Canadian Mediterranean Institute; Researcher, Canada Studies Foundation; Vice-president, Burlington Photographic Society; Author, co-author, editor and publisher of books, articles and short stories

Publications:

 Book Reviews

1983 “CANADIANS WANTED: NO LIBERALS NEED APPLY’’ in The Reviewing Librarian, 8:3, March 

1980 “BUG OFF, MR.CHIPS’’ in Books in Canada, 9:5, May 

1979 “HOW TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH A FEDERAL FANTASY’’ in Books in Canada, 8:3, March 

1970 “THE WINNIPEG GENERAL STRIKE”, Beatrice Magder (Toronto: MacLean-Hunter) and “ECONOMIC NATIONALISM”, Barry Riddell (Toronto: MacLean- Hunter) in The Canadian Journal of History and Social Science, 5:2, March 

1967 “GREAT BRITAIN SINCE 1688”, K. B. Smellie (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan) in History Newsletter, Jan. 

Book Review Articles

1980 “CORE WARS; THE DESPERATE FIGHT FOR TERRITORIAL CONTROL IN OUR SCHOOLS’’ in Books in Canada, 9:7, Aug.-Sept. 

“CLIO IN THE CLASSROOM’’ in Books in Canada, 9:3, March 

1979 “PERIPHERAL TO THE CORES’’ in Books in Canada, 8:7, Aug./Sept. 

“OTHER ERAS, OTHER OPTIONS’’ in Books in Canada, 8:3, March 

1978 “SYLLABUS FOR SURVIVAL’’ in Books in Canada, 7:7, Sept. 

1975 “CLIO WITH HER GIRDLE ON’’ in Books in Canada, 4:9, Sept. 

Articles

2002 “HEALTH CARE IN ONTARIO: A BUMMER OF A HOSPITAL STAY”, The CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES, September 

1992 “SABOTAGE — PART 2” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Fall 1992 

“A RESPONSE TO SETH KLINE” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Spring 

“SABOTAGE, SCAPEGOATS OR SUCKERS?” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Winter

1991“POLITICALLY CORRECT THOUGHT FOR HISTORY TEACHERS” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Spring 

“WHO AM I?” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Fall 

“HISTORICAL CONSCIOUSNESS” in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Fall 

1990 A RESPONSE TO “REFLECTIONS: A FIRST-YEAR TEACHER RECALLS THE YEAR’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Fall 

“THAT BABY IS UGLY’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Fall

1987 “ROOTS OF THE CLASSICAL AGE: SOME SCHOLARLY VIEWS ON CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN THE HISTORY OF ANCIENT GREECE’’ in THE ANCIENT WORLD, Autumn 

“THE SKILL OF SEPARATING FACT FROM OPINION’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Autumn (See also ONTERIS) 

“HOW I FAILED THE TAXONOMY TEST’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Spring (See also ONTERIS) 

1985 “PRACTICE TEACHING DIARY’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, Winter 

1983 “HOW I SURVIVED ANOTHER PRACTICE- TEACHING SESSION’’ in TEACHER EDUCATION, 22, April OHASSTA Journal, 4:2, Winter 

“FEUT-TORONTO HISTORY HEADS’ SURVEY’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, 3:3, Spring (See also ONTERIS) 

1981 “TEACHING IN 1991’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, 2:4, Summer. Reprinted in FORUM and TEACHER EDUCATION 

1980 “DEVELOPING SKILLS AND CONCEPTS’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, 1:3, June 

“RE-COOKING THE CURRICULUM’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, 1:3, June 

“CLIO SPEAKS’’ in RAPPORT, OHASSTA Journal, 1:3, June 

1972 “THE ROLE OF THE DEPARTMENT HEAD IN EVALUATION’’ in CORRIDOR, OISE, Northwestern News letter, 14 

Manual

1991 SECONDARY SCHOOL HISTORY TEACHING FOR COMPLETE, UTTER AND ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS, revised, 450 pages 

1990 SECONDARY SCHOOL HISTORY TEACHING FOR COMPLETE, UTTER AND ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS 

PHOTOGRAPHY AND DESIGN

1993 SAFETY MANUAL. CENTRE FOR BIOMATERIALS. University of Toronto, publisher and designer

1990 “LORNE HILL’S PHOTO OF THE MONTH’’, ABBEY’S OWN NEWSPAPER. January, February, March 

NEWSLETTER

2008-2014 MAPLEGROVE WEST NEWSLETTER, quarterly

2004 LOCAL LITERARY LAPSES, The Mariposa Writers’ Group, quarterly

2003-4 “THE MIND’S EYE”, The Mariposa Writers’ Group, quarterly, 

1999 “ON THE ROCKS”. Lake Dalrymple Associations for Environmental Protection. author and editor. Vol. 5

1995-6 “ON THE ROCKS”, Lake Dalrymple Associations for Environmental Protection. author and editor. Vol. 4

1994 “ON THE ROCKS”, Lake Dalrymple Associations for Environmental Protection. Newsletter. Vol. 3, #1-3, Spring, Summer, Autumn. author and editor.

1993 “ON THE ROCKS”, Lake Dalrymple Associations for Environmental Protection. Newsletter. Vol. 2, #1, May, author and editor 

1992 “ON THE ROCKS”, Lake Dalrymple Associations Newsletter. Vol. 1, #1-2, July and September, author and originator

1991 “THE BEACHER: THE NEWSLETTER FROM LAKE DALRYMPLE” Vol. 1, numbers 1-6, author and originator 

“IT’S OUR LAKE AND OUR LIVES”, Lake Dalrymple Associations 

“SAVE OUR ENVIRONMENT”, Lake Dalrymple 1980-1 

“COMMENTS FROM CLIO” History Department Newsletter Vol. 1, numbers 1-4. author and originator 

Briefs

2001 PRESENTATION TO THE ONTARIO MUNICIPAL BOARD re Need to Revise the Aggregate and Planning Acts. March. 40 pages

1996 PRESENTATION TO MINISTER OF EDUCATION, HONOURABLE JOHN SNOBELEN re Plan to Regulate Excavation of Carden Plain. February 2.

1995 APPLICATION FOR FUNDING ASSISTANCE TO THE CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENCE FUND on behalf of Lake Dalrymple Association. November 14. Approved December.

1993 “FUTURE DIRECTIONS: A BRIEF TO THE SIMCOE COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT FOR THE OFFICIAL COUNTY PLAN” on behalf of Lake Dalrymple Associations For Environmental Protection. January 31, 1993. (Also presented to Victoria County, Mara, Dalton, Orillia and Rama Townships and environmental groups from Georgian Bay to Coboconk as well as provincial and federal ministries.)

1992 APPLICATION FOR LEGAL ASSISTANCE TO THE CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENCE FUND on behalf of Lake Dalrymple Associations. Application accepted. Sept. 1992 

Publications: CO-AUTHOR 

Manual

1972 A GUIDE TO THE STORY OF WESTERN MAN, with Ricker, J. and Saywell, J., (Toronto: Clark Irwin). Revised and reissued as TEACHER’S MANUAL FOR THE EMERGENCE OF EUROPE AND EUROPE AND THE MODERN WORLD, 1977. 

Book 

1974 TWENTIETH CENTURY CANADA, with Conrad, M. and Ricker, J. (Toronto: Clark Irwin) 

EDITOR

1980 THE CONTEMPORARY CULTURES OF CANADA’S NATIVE PEOPLES, (Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons) a pamphlet 

CO-EDITOR

1980 MULTICULTURAL DOCUPAC, with Smith, G. (Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons) a kit 

1977 LET US LIVE: THE NATIVE PEOPLES OF CANADA, J. Embree, (Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons) a book

Books

1997 FACULTY FOLLIES: FEAR AND LOATHING AT A FACULTY OF EDUCATION (unpublished by order of the University of Toronto and Mr. Barry Prentice, lawyer)

2016-2021 A BOOK OF SHORT STORIES (unpublished)

2014- 2021 SINS OF THE MOTHERS: A MISSISSAUGA MEMOIR. (unpublished) 

A HISTORY OF THE FILM INDUSTRY IN CANADA: THE AMERICAN TAKEOVER. (ABANDONNED)